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#Nanowrimo The Kernal Idea: The Alpha and Omega of Your Book

This week is all about NaNoWriMo – how we can stay on track and what we’ll learn from it. Enjoy!

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My New Home

 

Hello, everyone!

Yes, I have a new home! I’ve moved Sexy, Smart and Strong to a hot new website!

Please visit soon. When you do, be sure to subscribe.

Subscribing means you’ll automatically receive my weekly blog posts in your email or your RSS feed.

Everyone who subscribes during the month of August is eligible to win a giveaway prize!

Subscribe today at this link:

Marcia Richards, sexy, smart and strong

CLICK MY SIGNATURE TO JUMP TO MY NEW WEBSITE!

 

Come on Over!

Happy Saturday to all!

 

I have a favor to ask. Since I moved to my new website, I found out I couldn’t take my subscribers with me automatically. ūüė¶

If you all still love Sexy, Smart and Strong, I’d like to ask to take a few seconds to click the SUBSCRIBE button at the NEW Sexy, Smart and Strong.

That’s the only way you’ll still get notices of posts and future contests and giveaways.

Come on over and just say Yes, Please!

Here’s the Link:

Marcia Richards, sexy, smart and strong

And for your records, the link URL is http://MarciaARichards.com

I hope to see you all there!

Everyone who subscribes will be eligible for a gift giveaway at the end of August!

Go click that button!

Moving on up!

Hi, everyone!

Today’s a big day here at Sexy, Smart and Strong!

I’m launching my NEW WEBSITE! Is that cool, or what?!

There is  so much to look at and do there!

Here’s the link: Marcia Richards, sexy, smart and strong

Soon you’ll get the posts in your email again, as usual.

SEE YOU THERE!

Diary of a Swimsuit Shopper

I am not a human being trying to have a spiritual experience; I am a spiritual being having a (sometimes difficult) human experience.

I am not yet, in my opinion, in any shape to don a swimsuit, however neither was this hilarious woman! I received this email from a friend and had a welcome roar of laughter.

(Author unknown) 
When I was a child in the 1950s, the bathing suit for the mature figure was-boned, trussed and reinforced, not so much sewn as engineered.¬† They were built to hold back and uplift, and they did a good job. Today’s stretch fabrics are designed for the prepubescent girl with a figure carved from a potato chip.

Debbie Reynolds, corset style bathing suit

The mature woman has a choice, she can either go up front to the maternity department and try on a floral suit with a skirt, coming away looking like a hippopotamus that escaped from Disney‘s Fantasia, or she can wander around every run-of-the-mill department store trying to make a sensible choice from what amounts to a designer range of fluorescent rubber bands.


What choice did I have? 
I wandered around, made my sensible choice and entered the chamber of horrors known as  the fitting room.  The first thing I noticed was the extraordinary tensile strength of the stretch material.  The Lycra used in bathing costumes was developed, I believe, by NASA to launch small rockets from a slingshot, which gives the added bonus that if you manage to actually lever yourself into one, you would be protected from shark attacks.  Any shark taking a swipe at your passing midriff would immediately suffer whiplash.


I fought my way into the bathing suit, but as I twanged the shoulder strap in place I gasped in horror, my boobs had disappeared! 
Eventually, I found one boob cowering under my left armpit.  It took a while to find the other. At last I located it flattened beside my seventh rib.

The horrors of trying on bathing suits

The problem is that modern bathing suits have no bra cups.  The mature woman is now meant to wear her boobs spread across her chest like a speed bump.  I realigned my speed bump and lurched  toward the mirror to take a full view assessment.


The bathing suit fit all right, but unfortunately it only fitted those bits of me willing to stay inside it.  The rest of me oozed out rebelliously from top, bottom and sides.  I looked like a lump of Playdoh wearing undersized cling wrap.


As I tried to work out where all those extra bits had come from, the prepubescent sales girl popped her head through the curtain, “Oh, there you are,” she said, admiring the bathing suit.


I replied that I wasn’t so sure and asked what else she had to show me. I tried on a cream crinkled one that made me look like a lump of masking tape, and a floral two-piece that gave the appearance of an over-sized napkin in a serving ring.
Trying on bathing suits

Miss, could you bring me a 20-year-olds body with that suit?

I struggled into a pair of leopard-skin bathers with ragged frills and came out looking like Tarzan‘s Jane, pregnant with triplets and having a rough day.


I tried on a black number with  a midriff fringe and looked like a jellyfish in  mourning.
I tried on a bright pink pair with such a high cut leg I thought I would have to wax my eyebrows to wear them.


Finally, I found a suit that fit, it was a two-piece affair with a shorts-style bottom and a loose blouse-type top.  It was cheap, comfortable, and bulge-friendly, so I bought it.  My ridiculous search had a successful outcome, I figured.


When I got it home, I found a label that read, “Material might become transparent in water.”


So, if you happen to be on the beach or near any other body of water this year and I’m there too, I’ll be the one in cut-off jeans and a T-shirt!


You’d better be laughing or rolling on the floor by this time. Life isn’t about how to survive the storm, but how to dance in the rain, with or without a stylish bathing suit!


What will you be seen wearing at the beach this summer? Do you have any clothing disaster stories to share?

Stop over at the Life List Club today. Sonia Medieros is posting. Go give her some comment luv, if you please.

 

What Do You Choose To Be Called?

Pink Heart

Sexy, smart and strong women have long been nicknamed, most often by men. Some carry negative connotations and others are somewhat endearing.

A few examples:

Skirt, Doll, and Dish – Skirt and Doll imply a cute, flirty and fun girl. Dish says, to me, a woman so delectable, a man can’t live without her.

Broad, Dame and Twist – These are slightly less complimentary. A Broad is a voluptuous woman, mainly in the derriere and one you don’t dare cross. A Dame is like a Broad but she cares a little more about her looks, using well-applied make-up. A Twist, to me, connotes a woman with special skills in the boudoir.

Floozy, Strumpet and Trollop – All of these¬† names suggest a women with loose morals, but don’t they sound like¬† potent cocktails (Cherry Floozy) or delicious pastries (Strumpet and cream)?

And then, there are those often offered up with a dose of sarcasm:

Little Miss Sunshine: A woman who happens to be happy with her life and carries through with a positive attitude.

Susie Homemaker: A woman who enjoys making a comfortable home for her family and is adept at baking, decorating and choosing fashionable clothing (or making everything herself).

Superwoman: A woman who balances many hats with aplomb, like elder caretaker, employee, wife, gardener, cook, committee chairperson, community volunteer, PTA president and soccer mom.

The only nickname I wouldn’t mind being called is

Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Wonder Woman first appeared in a comic book series in 1941.

Feminist, Gloria Steinem chose the image of Wonder Woman for the cover of her first issue of Ms. Magazine in July, 1972.

The TV series, Wonder Woman, followed in the late 1970s, starring Lynda Carter.

She was the perfect woman – powerful, graceful, sexy, tough, smart and compassionate, determined to expose the truth and punish the evil.

She looked really cute in glasses, too.

Male TV viewers fell in love/lust with her.

More than that, Wonder Woman was a great role model for all women. She didn’t let a man push her around, unless she wanted to be pushed.

She believed in herself and followed her heart, even when her path wasn’t what others wanted for her.

According to Wikipedia, “Wonder Woman’s viewpoints and characteristics reflect those of her creator, William Moulton Marston, who was a strong supporter of feminist ideals and female empowerment.

In a 1943 issue of The American Scholar, Marston wrote:

Not even girls want to be girls so long as our feminine archetype lacks force, strength, and power. Not wanting to be girls, they don’t want to be tender, submissive, peace-loving as good women are. Women’s strong qualities have become despised because of their weakness. The obvious remedy is to create a feminine character with all the strength of Superman plus all the allure of a good and beautiful woman.”

What image would you be comfortable with?

Should we all strive to be our own version of Wonder Woman? Or not?

I love hearing from you!

What Do You Choose to be Called?

Sexy, smart and strong women have long been nicknamed, most often by men. Some carry negative connotations and others are somewhat endearing.

A few examples:

Skirt, Doll, and Dish – Skirt and Doll imply a cute, flirty and fun girl. Dish says, to me, a woman so delectable, a man can’t live without her.

Broad, Dame and Twist – These are slightly less complimentary. A Broad is a voluptuous woman, mainly in the derriere and one you don’t dare cross. A Dame is like a Broad but she cares a little more about her looks, using well-applied make-up. A Twist, to me, connotes a woman with special skills in the boudoir.

Floozy, Strumpet and Trollop – All of these  names suggest a women with loose morals, but don’t they sound like  potent cocktails (Cherry Floozy) or delicious pastries (Strumpet and cream)?

And then, there are those often offered up with a dose of sarcasm:

Little Miss Sunshine: A woman who happens to be happy with her life and carries through with a positive attitude.

Susie Homemaker: A woman who enjoys making a comfortable home for her family and is adept at baking, decorating and choosing fashionable clothing (or making everything herself).

Superwoman: A woman who balances many hats with aplomb, like elder caretaker, employee, wife, gardener, cook, committee chairperson, community volunteer, PTA president and soccer mom.

The only nickname I wouldn’t mind being called is

Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman first appeared in a comic book series in 1941.

Feminist, Gloria Steinem chose the image of Wonder Woman for the cover of her first issue of Ms. Magazine in July, 1972.

The TV series, Wonder Woman, followed in the late 1970s, starring Lynda Carter.

She was the perfect woman – powerful, graceful, sexy, tough, smart and compassionate, determined to expose the truth and punish the evil.

She looked really cute in glasses, too.

Male TV viewers fell in love/lust with her.

More than that, Wonder Woman was a great role model for all women. She didn’t let a man push her around, unless she wanted to be pushed.

She believed in herself and followed her heart, even when her path wasn’t what others wanted for her.

According to Wikipedia, “Wonder Woman’s viewpoints and characteristics reflect those of her creator, William Moulton Marston, who was a strong supporter of feminist ideals and female empowerment.

In a 1943 issue of The American Scholar, Marston wrote:

Not even girls want to be girls so long as our feminine archetype lacks force, strength, and power. Not wanting to be girls, they don’t want to be tender, submissive, peace-loving as good women are. Women’s strong qualities have become despised because of their weakness. The obvious remedy is to create a feminine character with all the strength of Superman plus all the allure of a good and beautiful woman.”
What image would you be comfortable with?

Shouldn’t we all strive to be our own version of Wonder Woman?